📍Altes Museum, Berlin

Hallo!

After venturing to visit the Museum für Naturkunde, I spent the rest of my time in and around Museum Island and it might just be my favourite place on earth. Everything is so magical; the architecture, the views, the history, the food. If I could, I would live there forever!

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First up was the Altes Museum, the oldest museum on Museum Island. Originally known simply as ‘The Museum’, the name changed to Altes Museum in 1855 due to a new museum being built. And of course, the only logical way to differentiate between the two was to call the old museum the Altes (Old) Museum and the newer museum, the Neues (New) Museum! 😂 Makes sense right?!

The museum specialises in Greek and Roman antiquities so included the standard object that you’d expect: statues, helmets, statues, grave goods, statues, pottery and MORE STATUES! 🗽🗿

Aside from marble busts, there were lots of other really beautiful artefacts on display inside this museum of grandeur. I surprised myself by spending a good 30 minutes reading every text panel and inspecting each coin in the Numismatic Collection vault. I actually think it may have been my favourite room… 💶

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Honestly, until last year I didn’t even know what the word ‘numismatic‘ meant! But one of my first assignments in my role at the British Museum was to write a donor report for the Defacing the Past: damnation and desecration in imperial Rome exhibition. The exhibition, curated by Dario Calomino, presented ‘coins and other objects that were defaced, either to condemn the memory of deceased Roman emperors or to undermine the power of living ones’. Objects included a Suffragette defaced penny and the bust of Germanicus Caesar with his nose removed.

Whilst writing the report, I did lots of wider research into numismatics, the BM’s Coin Collections and even went on a BTS tour of Greece and Rome to improve my own knowledge (and make it seem like I knew what I was talking about!). I really think this prior understanding bettered my experience at the Altes Museum as it helped me understand this collection better. I know it sounds really self-indulgent but I find it very satisfying when I know something about an object or collection or person and find information relating to it – it makes me feel less intimidated by the academic language and more included in the museum.

My numismatic collection highlights: 

Left: Magnesia am Sipylos, Amazone nuit Peltaschild und Mauerkrone, Ihr gegeniber kykele, 197-217 N.Chr, Top right: Bank note: Röm. Republik: Aes Signatum280-242 v. Chr, Bottom right: Syracuse: Späte Dekadrachmen, Signatur: Kimon, UM406 V.Chr

A really great UK based group to get involved in if you’re interested in numismatic material and the like is The Royal Numismatic Society.  Established in 1836, the group and its members share a passion for coins, medals and other currency material. The Society recently sponsored an exhibition called ‘Currency of Communism’ at the British Museum. Another great resource is the Money and Medals Network, a group based at the British Museum and in association with the RNS, BNS and a number of key partners. “The Network aims to act as an information exchange for museum professionals within the UK whose collections include coins, medals and other objects relating to monetary and economic history and numismatics”.

In my next post I’ll feature some of my other favourites from the Altes Museum…

Happy museum musings, folks

Em xo

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