📍The Workers Museum, Copenhagen

Hi all,

In my last blog post I gave you an overview of my exciting visit to Copenhagen, Denmark as part of the SEMFED Study Trip. This week I am going to start writing about the individual museums that I visited; starting with The Workers Museum.

In 1871, a large Labour Movement began in Denmark. A year later, riots between the socialists and Danish authorities lead to Movement meetings being banned from public arenas. A local Labour Group in the city began collecting money to purchase a meeting space. By 1879 the group had raised enough money to purchase the building known as the Workers Assembly Building. In 1973 the space, which is reportedly the 2nd oldest workers building in the world, became The Workers Museum.

The Assembly Hall: Located on the first floor, this room originally served as the main space used for working class families to participate in political meetings, dances and reading clubs during the 1800’s. In 1913 a stunning glass cleaning was added whilst the side walls are decorated with intricate wooden carvings representing a variety of workers’ trades. Today, the space is used for weddings, lectures and museum conferences. In 2011, during the European refugee Crisis, the museum successfully secured £90,000 (750,000 Kroner) funding from the Ministry of Culture to create a new educational course suitable for young learners. The theme of Young Voices is democracy and its aim is to make young people’s voices heard. The Assembly Hall is used to teach these lessons rather than at school; linking back to the Hall’s original purpose. FUN FACT: Nelson Mandela spoke in the Hall in 1992!

The Children’s Workers Museum: My favourite part of the Museum – filled with handling objects, interactive stations and reconstructed spaces based on 1930s Denmark. The exhibition aims to teach young visitors about the way working class children lived in the past. The rags to riches story of Thorvald Stauning, a working class boy who grew up to be Denmark’s longest serving Prime Minister (1924 – 1926 and again from 1929 – 1942) is a major part of the exhibition narrative. Throughout the Children’s Workers Museum you can pretend to live, work and play like in the past whilst learning about child labour, working class life and how politics impacted Danish communities.

The Sørensens – A Working-Class Family: This gallery focuses on The Sørensens – a working class Danish family made up of two parents Peter; a Labourer, Karen; a housewife and their 8 children. The family moved to Copenhagen from the Danish countryside in 1885 and moved to various locations before settling in a two room flat in 1915. This flat is on permanent display as the Museum to explores give an insight into the home of unskilled labourers from the early 1900s.

In the late 1940s the parents passed away and after 7 children moved out, Yrsa (the second youngest daughter) stayed in the flat – where she lived until December 1989. When she moved to a residential home, her family kindly donated the entire contents of the family flat to the Workers Museum where it still stands for people to visit.

Alongside these permanent exhibitions, The Workers Museum also showcases special exhibitions – one of which I shall write about in my next post.

Happy museum musings!

Em xo

 

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