📍Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

A little different from the other museums I visited whilst in Amsterdam aye! But this was one that I’ve wanted to visit ever since I saw a poster for it in the Ipswich Museum offices when I was a Training Museum Trainee in 2015.

The Rijksmuseum, located in Museum Plein, is so grand, it’s pretty breath-taking. As you walk through the dimly lit tunnels with buskers playing modern songs such as Seven Nation Army on traditional instruments, you feel like you’re stepping back in time.

Although there are copious amounts of paintings and art works (which aren’t really my thing in all honesty) I did find some pieces that really jumped out at me.

My object highlights:

1. Carità Educatrice (Charity the Educator), Lorenzo Bartoloni (1777 – 1850), Florence, c.1842 – 1845, marble, (BK-2008-5-A)

img_0238

The woman personified the virtue of Caritàs (charity) in her role as educator – a typical Italian theme. She is caring for two children and encouraging the older one to read. Inscribed on his scroll is the moral “Do unto others as you would have others do unto you”. This piece was so beautiful with the shadow reflected onto the light grey wall behind and stood so powerfully in a room full of strong objects. With this sculpture, artist Bartolini contributed to a topical discussion about the importance of education in Tuscany at that time.

2. Glass vase in a brass mount attributes to the Wiener Kunstgewerbeschile, brass, glass, c. 1900 (BK-2015-21)

img_0256

I’m not really sure why I loved this object so much but I just felt mesmerised by it. The iridescent colours, contrasting materials and how I’ve never seen anything like it before. Also, the changing colours look pretty awesome in a boomerang!

3. Concentration Camp coat, worn by Isabel Wachenheimer, Texled, 1938 – 1945, rags printed with blue ink, synthetic buttons, (NG-2011-97-1).

img_0259

This numbered prison coat was worn by Isabel Wachenheimer (1928 -2010) in Lenzing Pettighofen concentration camp in Austria. Isabel had been transferred from Auschwitz death camp along with 500 other Jewish women in October 1944. This came just after her parents had been murdered at Auschwitz. The reality of this story really hit home; the fact that a human being who had survived the WW2 concentration camps had worn it and donated it was overwhelming. Underneath the coat is the Wachenheimer family photo album which made the display more relatable and personal.

4. Facial casts of Nias Islanders, plaster, after 1910, (NG- C-2012-3).

img_0262

These casts, created by anthropologist J.P. Kleiweg de Zwaan are the result of research he conducted into the physical characteristics of different ethnic groups. On a 1910 expedition to Nias – an island located off the coast of Sumatra, Indonesia – he covered the faces of a group of living men with plaster to record their appearances. Something about the casts fascinated me and it wasn’t until I’d left that I realised it was the power imbalance displayed in the artwork that was most prominent. The white European anthropologist visiting ethic minority groups and documenting their differences for his own experiment. The research and outcome felt very supremacist; reminding me of the race inequalities that have been present for centuries and continue in the present day.

I would definitely recommend this museum for anyone looking to do one big culture trip in Amsterdam. It would take a whole day to go around properly and there’s something for everyone: art, sculpture, weaponary, delftware, dolls houses: the lot. Another one ticked off ✅

Em xo

Advertisements