📍Medical Museion, Copenhagen

Happy Friday all,

My trip to Copenhagen was absolutely made by visiting this magnificent Medical Museum – so much so that I visited it twice during my 4 day trip!

I’m a massive fan of a Medical themed museum and an regular visitor to The Wellcome CollectionThe Hunterian MuseumOld Operating Theatre to name a few but this visit was next level for me for a few reasons. Firstly, the Museum is housed in the former Royal Academy of Surgeons – a building which is a current candidate for inclusion in UNESCO’s World Heritage List. The stunning auditorium, in which doctors were trained until 1942, is the stunning architectural heart of the Museum. Designed by Peter Meyn, the room is neoclassical in style with hints towards antiquity whilst the ceiling is based on the roof of the Pantheon temple in Rome. Leading medical personalities Galen and Hippocrates adorn the walls whilst reliefs depicting Asclepius, Athena, King Christian VII and Frederik IV are also featured.

Secondly, during the study trip we were able to get an exclusive behind the scenes look at the collections work being undertaken by conservators at the Museum. We ventured into the stores with Ion Meyer, Head of Collections where we met 3 Conservators that are currently working on a large scale documentation and digitisation project that is happening across museums in Copenhagen. Hearing about the project goals, challenges and successes thus far – as well as seeing some pretty cool hidden gems (including the box of 19th century drugs below) – was a great addition to the visit.

Finally, the Museum has utilised, it seems, every bit of space available to them so that no space is left as ‘nothing’. There are light installations in corridors, art pieces in alcoves and medical instruments filling shelving units. I’ve always been a collector – any spare space in my room is filled with nick-nacks, souvenirs or useless pieces of paper that I promise to “stick in my scrapbook”. So when I walk around museums and see areas of nothingness it makes me feel a little annoyed. On average only 5% of museum collections are on display at any one time (unbelievable I know!) so SURELY something could be displayed to fill the voids. The Medical Museum proved that this is something that can be achieved effectively without the objects or installations being damaged, at risk or feeling out of place.

In the next posts I’ll write about the 2 current special exhibitions on at the Museum; Mind the Gutand The Body Collected, again two of the best exhibits I’ve seen.

Happy Museum Musings!

Em xo

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📍The Workers Museum, Copenhagen

Hi all,

In my last blog post I gave you an overview of my exciting visit to Copenhagen, Denmark as part of the SEMFED Study Trip. This week I am going to start writing about the individual museums that I visited; starting with The Workers Museum.

In 1871, a large Labour Movement began in Denmark. A year later, riots between the socialists and Danish authorities lead to Movement meetings being banned from public arenas. A local Labour Group in the city began collecting money to purchase a meeting space. By 1879 the group had raised enough money to purchase the building known as the Workers Assembly Building. In 1973 the space, which is reportedly the 2nd oldest workers building in the world, became The Workers Museum.

The Assembly Hall: Located on the first floor, this room originally served as the main space used for working class families to participate in political meetings, dances and reading clubs during the 1800’s. In 1913 a stunning glass cleaning was added whilst the side walls are decorated with intricate wooden carvings representing a variety of workers’ trades. Today, the space is used for weddings, lectures and museum conferences. In 2011, during the European refugee Crisis, the museum successfully secured ÂŁ90,000 (750,000 Kroner) funding from the Ministry of Culture to create a new educational course suitable for young learners. The theme of Young Voices is democracy and its aim is to make young people’s voices heard. The Assembly Hall is used to teach these lessons rather than at school; linking back to the Hall’s original purpose. FUN FACT: Nelson Mandela spoke in the Hall in 1992!

The Children’s Workers Museum: My favourite part of the Museum – filled with handling objects, interactive stations and reconstructed spaces based on 1930s Denmark. The exhibition aims to teach young visitors about the way working class children lived in the past. The rags to riches story of Thorvald Stauning, a working class boy who grew up to be Denmark’s longest serving Prime Minister (1924 – 1926 and again from 1929 – 1942) is a major part of the exhibition narrative. Throughout the Children’s Workers Museum you can pretend to live, work and play like in the past whilst learning about child labour, working class life and how politics impacted Danish communities.

The Sørensens – A Working-Class Family: This gallery focuses on The Sørensens – a working class Danish family made up of two parents Peter; a Labourer, Karen; a housewife and their 8 children. The family moved to Copenhagen from the Danish countryside in 1885 and moved to various locations before settling in a two room flat in 1915. This flat is on permanent display as the Museum to explores give an insight into the home of unskilled labourers from the early 1900s.

In the late 1940s the parents passed away and after 7 children moved out, Yrsa (the second youngest daughter) stayed in the flat – where she lived until December 1989. When she moved to a residential home, her family kindly donated the entire contents of the family flat to the Workers Museum where it still stands for people to visit.

Alongside these permanent exhibitions, The Workers Museum also showcases special exhibitions – one of which I shall write about in my next post.

Happy museum musings!

Em xo

 

SEMFed Study Trip 2019: 📍Copenhagen, Denmark

Hej alle (hello all),

Back in 2015, when I was in my first museum role, I joined the South and East Museums Federation (SEMFed) as a way to network and attend events with other local museum professionals. The group organises study days throughout the year – of which I have attended 2 in Windsor and St Albans. The Federation also organises an annual Study Trip abroad. Each year SEMFed awards the Martin Howe Bursary to 2 Members who have not attended a Study Trip before. I was lucky to be a recipient of the bursary and join the group’s trip to Copenhagen, Denmark.

NB: This post will just be a quick overview of the trip as I would like give each museum their own individual posts as each one was so different and eye-opening that this round-up won’t do them the justice they deserve!

Day 1: Myself and my sister arrived in Copenhagen a day earlier than most and set about hitting up some of the main sights including The Little Mermaid and Nyhavn Canal. (FYI, the Little Mermaid is really very little and mildly disappointing!) We walked past some beautiful buildings, ventured through the city centre and stuffed our faces with top notch burgers from Friends & Brgrs.

Day 2: I was up bright and early ready to visit the first museum of the Study Trip: The Workers Museum (Arbejdermuseet). The Museum is located in the second oldest Workers Assembly Building in the world which was purchased by the labour movement in around 1879. The space has been a museum since 1973 and is on the Danish UNESCO list. The Museum has a variety of galleries that allow visitors to explore life of Danish people through time; from the Sørensen Family who moved to Copenhagen in 1885 to the working children of the 1930’s. Alongside this, we got a private tour of the special exhibition Clever Hands which explores craftsmanship in Denmark through film, sound and object handling.

On our walk to lunch we stopped off at Rosenborg Castle – a 400-year-old Renaissance castle built by Christian IV which holds The Royal Danish Collection.

In the afternoon we visited the Botanical Garden & Geological Museum (part of the Natural History Museum). We started off by getting warmed up in the Palm House which is located in the Botanical Gardens. The House, made from cast iron and glass, was built in 1872-74 and is based on the Crystal Palace in London. We then attended a lecture by Team Leader for Audiences and Schools, Anne Katrine Gjerløff, who explained more about the Museum’s redevelopment plans and the organisation’s recent restructure.

Day 3: On the third day of the trip we started by visiting the Medical Museion. Founded in 1907 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Danish Medical Association, the Museum was a public organisation until it successfully merged with the University of Copenhagen in 1918. The institution is primarily dedicated to the history of health and disease with a special interest in biomedicine. During our visit, the Head of Collections, Bente Vinge Pedersen took us on tour of the 2 special exhibitions currently on display: The Body Collected  and Mind the Gut. 

After a quick lunch break we began our visit to The National Museum of Denmark (Nationalmuseet). The Museum holds the largest and most important cultural, social and historical collection in Denmark; spanning multiple time periods, themes and collections from ancient times to the present day. On our visit we were shown around by Mette Boritz, Exhibitions Manager who showed us around some of her favourite parts of the Museum. The tour included exploring the new (highly controversial) Vikings exhibition, Meet the Rollers, a display aimed at young people based around TV’s famous Ramasjang Rollers and Life in Denmark, 2000 – 2020.

Day 4: On our final day of our trip, my sister and I returned to The Medical Museum as I wanted to explore the exhibitions in more detail. After this, we visited the Design Museum which is free to under 26’s = BONUS! We got to see the permanent exhibitions: The Danish Chair: An International Affair, Danish Design Now and 20th Century as well as the special exhibition Creme De La Creme which showcases some of the Museum’s oldest pieces that are rarely on display.

I am so grateful to SEMFed for awarding me with the Martin Howe bursary to enable me to attend the study trip and I’m excited to meet up with the lovely group again for future events and study days. Look out for my future posts where I’ll address each museum in more depth.

Happy museum musings,

Em xo