Tony Vaccaro: From Shadow to Light📍Getty Images Gallery, London

Last week I was exploring London and stumbled across this little gem whilst walking in the autumnal sunshine. The Getty Images Gallery is London’s largest photographic archive, holds one of the greatest collections of photos in the world. For context, Getty Images, the head US company founded in 1995 by Mark Getty and Jonathan Klein, has a collection of 80 million photographs and more than 50,000 hours of film stock.

The current exhibition on display at the London gallery is Tony Vaccaro: From Shadow to LightThis is Vaccaro’s first exhibition in the UK in over half a century and includes photographs taken during his time serving in World War II, living in post-war Europe alongside those he took of celebrities, artists and creators for global media.

Born Michelantonio Celestino Onofrio Vaccaro in Pennsylvania, December 1922, “Tony” Vacarro, is an Italian-American photographer who is well-known for his photographs taken during the Second World War when he served in the US Army. Against orders from army officials, he smuggled his beloved camera into battle. He would strategically position his camera lens through a torn button hole on his jacket to take images. He would also salute with one hand whilst secretly pressing press the shutter with the other to capture an image!

During ‘down time’, Vaccaro would take photographs of his fellow Infantry members which led to numerous reprimands but after an Army Major expressed an interest in his work, Tony was allowed to continue with his photography; under one condition – gun first, camera second. During this time, he produced almost 8,000 photos and went to extreme lengths to produce his images stating: “When I was not on a night mission, I processed my films in four army helmets and hung the wet negatives from tree branches to dry.” Many of his photos were destroyed or seized by authorities so only 25% of them still survive.

Unfortunately the lighting in the exhibition meant that there were reflections on all glass surfaces so the photographs I took (below) aren’t very good but I have found the best online links to the photographs which are included in the photo caption:

Firing Line in the Hurtgen Forest, Germany, 1945

Upon being honourably discharged from his position in 1945, Tony decided to stay in Europe rather than move back home to the US to begin a careers a professional photographer. During this time, he captured life in post-war Europe; covering issues across Germany and Western Europe.

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Kiss of Liberation, St. Briac Sur Mer, France 1944 – “Sargeant Gene Costanzo kneels to kiss a little girl during spontaneous celebrations in the main square of the town of St. Briac, France, August 14, 1944.” – Tony Vaccaro

With post-war America came a new age of popular magazines and celebrity; which Vaccaro took full advantage of. He travelled the world for 30 years, taking some of the most recognisable photographs of the 20th century; working with public figures from Sophia Loren and Pablo Picasso to Georgia O’Keefe and Hubert de Givenchy.

Top left: Picasso, Mougins, France, 1966. Bottom left: Marimekko Umbrella, (Tony ended up marrying the model at the bottom of this image)
Top right: Georgia O’Keefe with Cheese, New Mexico, 1960, Bottom right: Sophia Loren, actress, New York City, NY 1959.

The exhibition was curated by Shawn Waldron, a Curator at Getty Images, who worked alongside Tony Vaccaro’s studio to create this wonderful exhibition which showcases some of the finest photography I’ve ever seen. The humility and connection Vaccaro captures in his images is really special and his personal relationship with subjects is very apparent. The exhibition has just been extended for another month so you can catch it until 28th October. I’d recommend you make a detour if you’re in Central London before it closes.

Happy Museum Musings.

Em xo

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📍Curson Lodge, Silent Street: Ipswich, Suffolk

Each September, Heritage Open Days organises a free weekend of events and activities at over 2,000 heritage sites across England. The weekend involves over 5,000 events and is run by 4,000 volunteers! The aim is to open up the doors of places that celebrate local heritage to the community with sites including museums, stately homes and heritage buildings. Some of the sites are always open to the public but utilise the weekend to raise awareness or increase access to their site, others are often closed to the public thus opening up a rare opportunity to experience the site. And this year, we were blessed with not one but TWO weekends of heritage open days!

I was born in Ipswich, a multicultural town in Suffolk, East of England. I have always been interested in our local history; visiting (and working) in local museums, reading my grandad’s local history books and going on tours with my mum as a youngster. For 25 years I have been passing the beautiful building that is known as ‘Curson Lodge’ on Silent Street and thanks to #HODIpswich2018, I finally got to explore inside!

This beautiful Tudor building, which spans 1-9 Silent Street and 45-47 St Nicholas Street, was built in two phases during the late-15th and early-16th centuries. The white and black corner property has been recognised as one of the most complete examples of an early Tudor inn anywhere in Britain. In 2006, the Ipswich Building Preservation Trust undertook essential restoration and conservation on this late medieval Grade II* listed building thanks to a generous grant from the Ipswich Borough Council.

According to a report by Leigh Alston, the inn was built to accommodate the extra guests and servants of those staying in the Palace on the opposite side of the road. The house, owned by Lord Curson, was visited by the likes of King Henry VII and Catherine of Aragon therefore a space was needed to house their royal parties. Mr Alston states that at the beginning of the 16th century the inn had an extension built – a new hall to the left of the parlour section in Silent Street and a large room with a new separate entrance was added to the part of the property on St Nicholas Street. The extension included features such as carved ceilings, a side-purlin roof and a jetted gallery at the back of the building.

On a wall downstairs, numerous layers of wallpaper dating from the early-19th to mid-20th century were found during the restoration. Although the plaster had to be replaced and the wallpaper recovered for conservation reasons, there were photographs showing what the layered wallpaper underneath looked like.

Layered wallpaper found underneath the panelling in Curson Lodge

The first floor parlour shows an early-19th century renovation. In true Georgian fashion, the original Tudor beams have been hidden by pine mouldings whilst a fireplace was added for extra comfort in what would have become a family home. The first family documented to have lived in the property were the Crispin’s; a family of tailors who moved in to the property in 1841. Since then, the house has been occupied by Greengrocers, Scholars and Bootmakers. The last use of the building was as a book shop called “Claude Cox Books” which ran out of the property from 1985 – 2016.

The house is often referred to as Wolsey’s birthplace and although is true that Thomas Wolsey was born in Ipswich, he was actually born above a Butcher’s shop on the opposite side of the street, not in Curson Lodge!

Getting to explore such a a local gem thanks to Heritage Open Days was wonderful and I can’t wait for 2019’s adventures – when HOD will be running for a whole week!

Happy museum musings!

Em xo

📍Altes Museum, Berlin

Hallo!

After venturing to visit the Museum für Naturkunde, I spent the rest of my time in and around Museum Island and it might just be my favourite place on earth. Everything is so magical; the architecture, the views, the history, the food. If I could, I would live there forever!

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First up was the Altes Museum, the oldest museum on Museum Island. Originally known simply as ‘The Museum’, the name changed to Altes Museum in 1855 due to a new museum being built. And of course, the only logical way to differentiate between the two was to call the old museum the Altes (Old) Museum and the newer museum, the Neues (New) Museum! 😂 Makes sense right?!

The museum specialises in Greek and Roman antiquities so included the standard object that you’d expect: statues, helmets, statues, grave goods, statues, pottery and MORE STATUES! 🗽🗿

Aside from marble busts, there were lots of other really beautiful artefacts on display inside this museum of grandeur. I surprised myself by spending a good 30 minutes reading every text panel and inspecting each coin in the Numismatic Collection vault. I actually think it may have been my favourite room… 💶

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Honestly, until last year I didn’t even know what the word ‘numismatic‘ meant! But one of my first assignments in my role at the British Museum was to write a donor report for the Defacing the Past: damnation and desecration in imperial Rome exhibition. The exhibition, curated by Dario Calomino, presented ‘coins and other objects that were defaced, either to condemn the memory of deceased Roman emperors or to undermine the power of living ones’. Objects included a Suffragette defaced penny and the bust of Germanicus Caesar with his nose removed.

Whilst writing the report, I did lots of wider research into numismatics, the BM’s Coin Collections and even went on a BTS tour of Greece and Rome to improve my own knowledge (and make it seem like I knew what I was talking about!). I really think this prior understanding bettered my experience at the Altes Museum as it helped me understand this collection better. I know it sounds really self-indulgent but I find it very satisfying when I know something about an object or collection or person and find information relating to it – it makes me feel less intimidated by the academic language and more included in the museum.

My numismatic collection highlights: 

Left: Magnesia am Sipylos, Amazone nuit Peltaschild und Mauerkrone, Ihr gegeniber kykele, 197-217 N.Chr, Top right: Bank note: Röm. Republik: Aes Signatum280-242 v. Chr, Bottom right: Syracuse: Späte Dekadrachmen, Signatur: Kimon, UM406 V.Chr

A really great UK based group to get involved in if you’re interested in numismatic material and the like is The Royal Numismatic Society.  Established in 1836, the group and its members share a passion for coins, medals and other currency material. The Society recently sponsored an exhibition called ‘Currency of Communism’ at the British Museum. Another great resource is the Money and Medals Network, a group based at the British Museum and in association with the RNS, BNS and a number of key partners. “The Network aims to act as an information exchange for museum professionals within the UK whose collections include coins, medals and other objects relating to monetary and economic history and numismatics”.

In my next post I’ll feature some of my other favourites from the Altes Museum…

Happy museum musings, folks

Em xo